Kyle Sargent ‘19 Historical Legal Committee HLegal@worldmun.org

Kyle Sargent ‘19
Historical Legal Committee HLegal@worldmun.org

 

Kyle Sargent is a senior at Harvard College, studying Mathematics and Computer Science. Prior to attending college, he lived in Chicago. At Harvard, he is involved in the International Relations Council, a politics and Model-UN oriented student group. Within the IRC this year, he is directing DISEC for HNMUN-LA. In the past, he directed for HMUN Boston and HMUN China, and traveled with Harvard’s competitive Model UN team. At WorldMUN this year, he will be directing the Legal committee. 

Outside of Model UN, Kyle’s extracurricular interests include machine learning research, the Harvard wine society, and reviewing movies and TV for the school newspaper. He also enjoys cult movies and doing impressions.

Topic: Laws of War in the War on Terror

In 2014, ISIS made significant advances in both Syria and Iraq, leaving behind a train of bloodshed and damage. The United States decided to begin bombing ISIS in Syria, and following that, other European countries joined the campaign. While the threat of extremist ideology and terrorism need to be addressed, many debate the legality of the method used by the United States.  This Historical Legal Committee will focus on the events leading to the United States’ first bombing of ISIS in Syria in 2014. Specifically, this committee will explore the legality of the US led campaign using the international laws of war and precedent of Jus Ad Bellum – when a country can invade - and Jus in Bello – international humanitarian law. The committee will address questions such as, what is the “war on terror”? Do the legal justifications of responding to 9/11 extend until today? How can the law of wars of Jus and Bellum and Jus in Bello be interpreted? How can countries legally respond to such a threat in the context of an ongoing war in Syria and an unpopular leader? This Historical Legal Committee will determine the legality of the campaign, debate other alternatives, and ultimately create a resolution recommending future action to the United Nations.