AYMAN MOHAMMaD '19  Emergency Assembly of Global Health Officials, 1918 FLU@worldmun.org

AYMAN MOHAMMaD '19
Emergency Assembly of Global Health Officials, 1918 FLU@worldmun.org

 

Ayman is a fourth-year student at Harvard studying economics while also premed. Born and raised in the hipster enclave of Williamsburg, Ayman is a die-hard Brooklyn native and is very proud of his hometown. At Harvard, Ayman was a co-president of the South Asian Association and works at the Alumni Association as well. Last year, Ayman was the Under-Secretary General for General Assembly and the year before SPECPOL chair; however, he is now making a transition into the exciting world of Crisis committees and is thrilled to have delegates thinking on their feet! When he’s not MUN-ing, Ayman enjoys running, basketball, and keeping up with the plethora of Netflix/HBO shows he follows (including but not limited to West World, Narcos, and Game of Thrones). Ayman cannot wait to meet you all and hopes to generate discussion through diplomacy to resolve current issues that face us in the world today. Please feel free to reach out to Ayman for anything or if you just want to chat too!

Topic: Confronting the Spanish Flu Pandemic

Between 1918 and 1920, a new vicious, viral outbreak infected about one-third of the world’s population and caused the deaths of 20-50 million people worldwide. Spreading throughout America, Europe, and Asia, the influenza virus did not discriminate in its victims and left physicians and public health specialists confused to its cause and any possible treatment. In the United States alone, the disease had reduced the life-expectancy by twelve years. Currently, most recent investigations believe the virulent nature of the disease arose from a perfect storm of factors such as malnourishment, poor hygiene, and overcrowded hospitals that led to this superinfection. What specific steps could have been taken to mitigate the effect of the Spanish flu and protect patients globally? How could current public health systems have been better designed to tackle a pandemic of this proportion?