amy tan '18 United Nations development programme

amy tan '18
United Nations development programme

 

 

A three-time veteran of WorldMUN, Amy is excited to be directing her last committee on a topic so dear to her heart. Previously, she has directed committees about China, the Soviet Union, Nigeria, and Lebanon in Montreal, Rome, India, and Boston. She currently serves as the Director-General of Harvard National Model United Nations - Latin America and enthusiastically invites all of her delegates to try some pisco sour with her in Lima this January. Outside of Model UN, Amy enjoys swing dancing, skiing, adrenaline rushes, new cuisines, and new adventures. She cannot wait to meet all of her delegates and sincerely hopes that this topic will encourage delegates to promote gender equality both inside and outside of the committee.

Topic: Gender Discrimination

Gender discrimination is ubiquitous throughout the societies and economies of both developing and developed countries. It is not only a humanitarian problem, but a serious development issue, where countries are unable to tap into the rich human capital provided by women due to the low labor force participation rate, number of women in government offices, and bargaining power within households. In developing countries, gender discrimination often manifests itself in a very different way, where women face a unique set of challenges. In brawn-based and agricultural-based economies, women will have lower aggregate productivity levels compared to men due to barriers to property ownership or limited inputs. Because of the lower perceived and/or true returns to investing in women, households will make (arguably) optimal decisions to invest less in girls’ education or health. In economies with limited credit markets, women tend to participate less in formal financial markets and banking institutions. Even if economic models prove that households are making decisions that maximize overall well-being through gender discrimination, a host of detrimental consequences undeniably result from these actions. Empirically, women receive less educational and employment opportunities, have less bargaining power within households, and are severely restricted due to their financial dependence on men. This committee will use economic studies and theories as a foundation to crafting resolutions that address gender discrimination in developing countries. It is my sincere hope that this committee will not only improve delegates’ knowledge about economics or gender issues, but inspire delegates to apply the lessons from the committee to create positive change within their own communities. This committee will use economic studies and theories as a foundation to crafting resolutions that address gender discrimination in developing countries. It is my sincere hope that this committee will not only improve delegates’ knowledge about economics or gender issues, but inspire delegates to apply the lessons from the committee to create positive change within their own communities.